A Daily Photo Blog about Life in Northern New South Wales, Australia.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Ulmarra to Southgate Ferry


It is a tiny cable ferry but also one of the great river crossings of New South Wales. You will often have it all to yourself as although it is a vital piece of transport, it only services a couple of hundred people and trucks aren't allowed. During floods the ferry is chained to the tall poles so it won't wash away. The height of the poles gives a good idea of how high the water gets in a major flood.


There is not much to do except turn off the car and enjoy the 5 minute scenic ride; oh and it is traditional at this time of the year to give the ferryman a small Christmas present.
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This is a Watery Wednesday Post. Click here for more watery scenes from our planet.

20 comments:

  1. I would drive out of my way to take a little ferry like that! But if the poles are an indication of the flood levels, then I am glad I am not there...

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  2. we just got home from a wonderful trip to Australia! what a cute little ferry crossing this is...wish we had stumbled upon it!

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  3. A five-minuter ferry ride sounds like fun. Sure beats rowing a boat.

    How nice to give the ferryman a gift!

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  4. i'd like more than a 5-minute ride on that :)

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  5. This brings back memories of travelling on the ferry at Wiseman's Ferry in the Hawkesbury area! So love the experience of travelling in a motionless car and enjoying the passing view!

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  6. So often these little traditions of ferries are replaced by a fixed link. It may be more convenient, but I like the idea of slowing down and waiting for the crossing.

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  7. Good one. It's like the Putney punt in Sydney.

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  8. This looks so idyllic, Mark. Lovely capture.

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  9. We ride a ferry to and from Baimbridge Island at Seattle when we go to see middle son. I love it, but they have to ride it both ways daily to go to work in the city. That is a real toughie. Your photos are so nice. They are full of wonderful detail. So pretty. Those poles are pretty high so I know the water really does rise during flooding. genie

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  10. Nice captures Mark. We've been on this one only once, we should do it again. Lone enough and quiet enough to get out of the car/bus too.

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  11. Glad the ferryman is not obliged to give each passenger a coin, Mark! Gorgeous landscapes.

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  12. Oh I love this...the water is so still...the reflections are perfect...beautiful.

    ATCHAFALAYA SWAMP PHOTOS is my link for today. Hope you can find time to visit with me.

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  13. A wonderful capture!
    And I'm curious...what did you bring as a gift?:)

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  14. Oh it's been a long time since I saw a small ferry like that.

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  15. Dawn my favourite gift is gold covered chocolate money. In the old days people gave them beer and home cooked sweets/cake.

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  16. I'd love to try that ferry.
    Ach, if only we in Israel had such wide rivers!

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  17. I just discovered your blog via Watery Wednesday... how have I not managed to find it earlier??!!
    I love your header too... so beautiful & conjures up so many happy & peaceful memories of 12 months of my life, living in the Clarence Valley (South Grafton to be exact).
    I am your newest follower :)

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  18. In my childhood I rode a lot of ferry's, but most of them bigger than this one. It has a certain nostalgia I cannot describe! A nice tradition to think of the ferryman!

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  19. Ferry jest wygodne dla wszystkich grup wiekowych. Jest to wygodne do 14 miesięcy za dziecko. promy oferują wiele w strefach do dzieci w podróż po krajach europejskich.

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