A Daily Photo Blog about Life in Northern New South Wales, Australia.

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

North Lismore Memorial Rest Park


This is the original European pioneers cemetery in Lismore located on the Nimbin Road. However not is all that it seems.
In the late 1960's the cemetery had become overgrown and unused for over fifty years. All the headstones were collected and repositioned in the top corner of the hill and a park was created.

The headstones now look down on their former resting places. Overall it is a pretty uninspiring/boring park but once again all is not what it seems.
In the mid 1970's a series of events occurred here that had 100's of people flocking to the cemetery at night and led to sensational stories across Australia and round the world, but I will tell you about that next week.

This is a Taphophile Tragics Post. Click here for Julie's meme about cemeteries.

This is an Our World Tuesday Post. Click here for more scenes from around our planet.

25 comments:

  1. Interesting story!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

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  2. What an interesting post and now I can't wait until next week to read more! Really terrific captures! Have a great week, Mark!

    Sylvia

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  3. You have written a great post and I love the photos and the story. Now, I can not wait until next week to read more.

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  4. Great post, Mark. Amazing how a lot of cemeteries were situated in wonderful sites with fantastic views...

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  5. Interesting post. I'm not sure the families of the various deceased would be happy about their monuments being moved but they do make a stunning statement on the hillside.

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  6. Had no idea there were so many of these memorial parks around.

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  7. interesting, I cant wait to hear what happened. I am your newest follower. If you have time to stop by my site I would appreciate it. Thanks!

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  8. That is an unusual cemetery. So we play on the graves now? I saw your comment on Joan's Sweet Wafaring about a blogger app for an iphone. I have one for our ipad but our photos come out blurry on the blog. Do you know how to fix that? I would appreciate some help here.

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  9. I was thinking what Jan said...that the families might not be so happy about markers being moved. I think it is beautiful what they have done and think it is a fine idea. Love the front and back shots. Lovely picture taking. genie

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  10. NEXT WEEK!! are you kidding Mark! It's quite an impressive sight to see all the headstones in rows on the hill looking over the park, great picture for the theme and looking forward to next Tuesday to find out what the sensational stories were!

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  11. I thought the headstones were a bit close together!! You're such a tease ...

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  12. Genie: The big black column on left of shot 1 is the headstone of the Wotherspoon Family. I found a small marker on the flat by the family stating this was the site of the family graves and a number of trees planted by descendents.
    Grace & Red: My photo/story deserves it's own post as it is complicated but sensational.

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  13. They were fortunate the most of the headstones were similar. What would they have done if there were those super ornate ones in the cemetery.

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  14. The headstones are like watchers! Immediately I thought of the arrangement on Easter Island! All facing one way! But then, these are much closer together! Hmmm I wonder if somehow....My mind is running away! I'll wait till next week!

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  15. You certainly know how to present history, Mark.

    As soon as I saw them all lined up like that, I knew that they had been moved. And no bodies to go with them: distressing that. But I guess all descendents with direct contact are also deceased. I agree with Diane: 'so we play on the graves now'.

    That Wotherspoon family puts me in mind of my father's teacher, Bertie, on whom you commented last week.

    Now I was around in the 1970s - just, mind you!! Is this the sort of story that made the extinct 'Australasian Post' or 'Pix'? Okay, okay. I will wait. brrrump ... brrrump ... brrrump ... impatiently mind you.

    Be a good lad, and enter this post on the TT linky, pulease ...

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  16. Look forward to learning more about this story Mark. As Julie says you do know just how to present history and to tell a story.

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  17. They moved the stones, but not the graves? Shades of the movie Poltergeist!

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  18. I guess cemetries and their ongoing up-keep are an expense that councils would rather not have to deal with - I went to visit the burial site of my Great-Grand Father only to find his headstone stacked up against a side fence along with many others.
    At least your Lismore headsones have been shown a little more respect - I look forward to hearing more of the story!

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  19. You Australians and moving headstones... is this a common national practice?

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  20. Can't wait to hear the story next week. In the meantime, I find it absolutely fascinating that the headstones were just gathered up and replaced in a more aesthetic pattern.

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  21. I look forward to the story next week. This week though - well - the arrangement is really impressive. It has a sort of Stonehenge/Easter Island quality to it.

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  22. Lived in n lismore in my early years and c an remember sliding on pieces of iron down hill between headstones.Came across page when looking for relatives who I think are buried .I did"t know it was now a park. an aunt lived across the road and told us had seen glowing cross many years before it was famous.I was born 1930 in terania streeet

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    1. Great story anonymous. I had some relatives that lived in Kyogle St, Sam and Amy Jacobs. Coincidence that today I was in Lismore for first time in 5 months and had a nice drive around Terania St and drove around the cemetery. All the best.

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  23. further to my comment 16th may. I was with agroup of people yesterday and got talking about the glowing cross and two had seen it when young Was living in Vic.when it came out in papers so wasn't privileged to see it.I left n lismore aged 8.

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    1. It is one of my favourite North Coast stories and still a complete mystery.

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