A Daily Photo Blog about Life in Northern New South Wales, Australia.

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Coutts Crossing Cemetery



Coutts Crossing is a village about 15 minutes from Grafton on the Armidale Road. The cemetery is only a 100 metres from the village but is surrounded by natural bush and trees and has an air of isolation but also peace and quiet.
The oldest inscription is 1895 and it is still in use. It is a typical Australian bush cemetery with the gigantic termite mound that has almost encroached the graves.

Although it is mown by the Council, there is a disheveled feel due to all the leaf litter and tumbledown fences, I quite like this forlorn atmosphere.


This is the grave of Charlie Butters who died in 1988. I only met him once when I was a child. Every Easter my family went to Sydney and on one of these trips my dad said he could get us to the top of Australia Square, then Sydney's tallest skyscraper at 50 floors, for free. Charlie operated the goods lift and I remember getting in it with boxes of lettuce and tomatoes, I suppose headed for the famed revolving Summit Restaurant on the 47th floor.
Charlie would've been 100 in a few months and on another personal note I married his great-niece.

This is my contribution to Julie's Taphophile Tragics meme.

16 comments:

  1. Interesting post, Mark. Old cemeteries that are a bit rundown have such an amazing atmosphere. Love visiting them.

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  2. Interesting! I don't think that little iron fence is going to stop the termite mound, though it may take some time to engulf it.

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  3. Yeah, I like this sort of cemetery, too. Actually, I like nearly all sorts of cemeteries, so my first sentence does not add to the world's knowledge!

    It is quizzical though. How come the double fencing? Try to keep livestock out, perhaps. But the steel pipe fence just peters out along at least one perimeter. I wonder why that tree was ring-barked? Surely when it is completley dead, they will have to remove it, or run the risk of it falling on the cemetery. It looks to be a pine-tree judging from the bark, which means it will degrade quickly and shed limbs. Ugh. Messy.

    See that first photo you have included. I love that type of lichen/moss/mould that 'creeps' like that. But I wonder why. Why on this headstone and not on the one next to it?

    Welcome back, Mark. Good to have your neck of the woods represented in Taphophile Tragics again.

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  4. I think you might be the first to post a family connection.

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  5. Thank you for explaining that termite mound! Do they usually get that huge before someone deals with them?

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  6. ITS a sweet looking cemetery....a little tlc needed but it is peaceful looking...
    SO you married into the family..Cool!

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  7. I like these old dishevelled cemeteries too. So much more interesting.

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  8. What a wonderful connection to such a beautiful cemetery. I think it's a real shame when places like this are left to fall into disrepair with only the most basic of maintainance. But it does give it a charm of it's own.

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  9. Excellent post Mark, I bet Charlie would be chuffed at that news!!

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  10. Great photo's here . I would love to see where that termites are going.

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  11. Lovely memories and words Mark. You have captured the atmosphere of the cemetery in your photos. Great post.

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  12. It certainly has a faded charm and looks like an ideal place for quiet reflection.

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  13. i like the name butters... it reminds me of south park and the character butters, hes so cute!

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  14. This looks much like many of our rural cemeteries here in the South - minus the termite mound, of course!

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  15. This is the kind of place where I would like to rest.

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